Many paths and trails that people walk on today have been part of rich histories worth telling. Explored by important people who have created history, these are the ones who have shaped and molded cities, roads, and routes to what they are now. Many of these places are still being wonderfully maintaned, and continue to serve as different forms of commemoration.

Here are some trails that will make visitors appreciate and learn more about the history of a specific place. These are paths that have been preserved and being constantlymaintained to make people remember of important events that happened in the past. These are places that made the current place the way it is now, and going on a trip to them will definitely make travel more interesting.


source: hawkebackpacking.com

Boston Freedom Trail

This famous and historical trail in Boston, Massachusetts in the United States leads visitors to 16 sites stretching about 2.5 miles. It is in this trail where you will get practically all knowledge you need to know about the American Revolution and the people who participated in it.


source: budgettravel.about.com

The paths are marked red, that’s why you will not have any difficulty finding the right spots. Some of the most important and official trail sites are as follows: The Boston Common, The State House, Granary Burying Ground, King’s Chapel, Benjamin Franklin Statue, Old South Meeting House, Old State House, Site of the Boston Massacre, Faneuil Hall, Paul Revere House, The Old North Church, Copp’s Hill Burying Ground, Bunker Hill Monument, and the USS Constitution. You can start anywhere you’d like, as there are no strict rules on where to begin.


source: ryangrayson.blogspot.com

Lewis and Clark National Historic Trail

This is where the Lewis and Clark or Corps of Discovery Expedition took place. Being the first ever transcontinental expedition in the country’s Pacific Coast, doing this trail will definitely be rewarding. Aside from taking part in an important event in history, you could also do some fun activities such as horseback riding, boating, hiking, and other adventures. You can stop by the trails official headquarters at Omaha, Nebraska before you begin your trip.

source: primeportal.net

Amalfi Coast Trails

These are paths that will give you magnificent views as well as lots of great new things to learn. By taking a tour in the historical spots of the Amalfi coast, visitors will learn and see so many new things that will give you a wider perspective of this part of Italy.


source: italykayaktours.com

The Amalfi Coast is a UNESCO World Heritage Site, so you will sure be in for lots of beautiful stops. Some of the paths that we suggest are visits to the important structures in the many different municipalities in the coast. This path may include the ancient churches at Praiano, the iconic religious site at Positano, or the artistic gardens and historic churches of Ravello. You will have so many to choose from, and there are also many available path tours offered by different companies if you’re the type that would prefer travel guides.


source: genius-loci.it

Appalachian Trail

This is for those looking for more a adventure-filled trip. Also known as the Appalachian National Scenic Trail (or sometimes, simply “AT”), this is a marked hiking trail in the eastern side of the United States that extends from Gerogia’s Springer Mountain and Maine’s Mount Katahdin.

The public footpath stretched for about 2,181 miles is visited by millions of people every year. You will catch so many scenic views here–it’s up to you if you wish to take on the whole trail or if you just want to take short, scenic walks. Some of the places where you’d want to make a stop to are the nearby attractions of Appalachian Trail Conservancy, Chesapeake and Ohio Canal National Historical Park, and the Great Smoky Mountains National Park.


source: ru.wikipedia.org

Trail of Tears

By taking a trip to this trail, you will learn more about the removal of the Cherokee people from their homelands. The Indian Removal Act of 1830 drove Cherokees from their territories to the present-day Oklahoma. This trail is available today to commemorate this devastating event, which killed more than 4,000 out if 15,000 people. 


source: commons.wikimedia.org

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